Job opening in Roswell - Disease Prevention Supervisor

Greetings all -

An important position on our statewide Disease Prevention Team (DPT) has posted for recruitment. Please help us to spread the word to qualified candidates.

The posting can be seen here.

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/newmexico/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=929552

The deadline is a week from Monday, on August 11th. Candidates should be sure to attach all required documents such as academic transcripts.

A summary of the position is pasted below.

;)
A


Andrew A. Gans, MPH
HIV, STD and Hepatitis Section Manager
New Mexico Department of HEALTH (NMDOH)
1190 St. Francis Drive, Room S-1302
Santa Fe, NM 87502-6110
(505) 476-3624
Fax: (505) 827-2862
andrew.gans@state.nm.us
Searchable HIV/STD/Hepatitis/Harm Reduction
resources on the web: www.nmhivguide.org

The next training on Rapid HIV Testing is coming up.

RSVPs are due by Friday, September 5th.

;)
A

Andrew A. Gans, MPH
HIV, STD and Hepatitis Section Manager
New Mexico Department of HEALTH (NMDOH)

The next training on Rapid HIV Testing is coming up.

RSVPs are due by Friday, September 5th.

;)
A

Andrew A. Gans, MPH
HIV, STD and Hepatitis Section Manager
New Mexico Department of HEALTH (NMDOH)

Free Condoms at your local public health office.

Free Condoms at your local public health office.

Tags: condoms

NM HCV Coalition Reminder

Hello,

I hope everyone is having a fantastic summer :). I wanted to shoot out a reminder for those of you who are future planners. The next NM HCV Coalition meeting will held on September 23, 11am to 12:30 at the UNM ECHO Institute. As we get closer to the date I will send out call-in and contact info.

Enjoy the remainder of your Summer,

Laine

Laine M Snow
Viral Hepatitis Prevention Coordinator
New Mexico Dept. of Health

Tags: Hepatitis

Dear Colleagues:

Worldwide, an estimated 400 million people are living with chronic viral hepatitis. Each year, nearly 1 million people die from viral hepatitis or related diseases.

Please join us via live stream on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 from 12:00 PM – 2:30 PM (Eastern), when the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, Office of National Drug Control Policy, and White House Initiative for AAPIs will commemorate World Hepatitis Day and recognize leaders in the field.

The event will feature remarks from senior federal officials as well as community leaders including:

* Michael Botticelli, Acting Director, White House Office of National Drug Control Policy
* Douglas Brooks, Director, White House Office of National AIDS Policy
* Ambassador Deborah Birx, U.S. Global AIDS Ambassador
* Dr. Howard Koh, Assistant Secretary for Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
* Dr. Paul Farmer, Partners in Health

As you are also an important part of our national response to viral hepatitis, we hope you can join us virtually for this important event on www.whitehouse.gov/live. Please share this message with your colleagues, state and local partners, and others who have an interest in viral hepatitis so that they, too, can observe World Hepatitis Day. You can also join the conversation on Twitter with hashtag.

Thank you for your efforts to “break the silence” around viral hepatitis in the United States and around the world.

Sincerely,

Ronald O. Valdiserri, MD, MPH
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health, Infectious Diseases
Director, Office of HIV/AIDS and Infectious Disease Policy

Ron Valdiserri | corinna.dan@hhs.gov | Office of HIV/AIDS and Infectious Disease Policy | Department of Health and Human Services - 200 Independence Avenue S.W. | Washington, DC 20201


Email Marketing by [Image removed by sender. iContact - Try It Free!]

Dear Colleagues,
I am delighted to announce that beginning August 11, 2014, Dr. Eugene McCray will serve as the Director of the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP) in NCHHSTP. Dr. McCray brings many years of domestic and global experience in HIV and TB prevention and control to his work in DHAP.
[McCray Photo_Oct2007]
Eugene McCray, MD

Many of you know Dr. McCray, as he has been instrumental in CDC’s efforts from the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and in 2000 he helped to stand up and then lead CDC’s Global AIDS Program. Dr. McCray began his career at the CDC in 1983 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer and has since served in a number of capacities throughout CDC.

Dr. McCray most recently was the Chief of the International Research and Programs Branch in DTBE. Prior to this position, Dr. McCray was the Acting Deputy Director in the Coordinating Office for Global Health at CDC from 2004 to 2007 and Director of CDC’s Global AIDS Program from 2000 to 2004. In these positions, Dr. McCray directed and developed epidemiological, programmatic, and research activities, as well as facilitated collaboration across CDC, with other US government agencies, multilateral and international agencies, and Ministries of Health. He is recognized globally as an expert in HIV/AIDS and TB and has dedicated most of his career to improving the health of underserved communities both in the United States and globally.
Dr. McCray completed his clinical training in internal medicine at North Carolina Memorial Hospital, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 1983 and an Infectious Diseases Fellowship in 1992 at University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. He has authored or co-authored more than 60 scholarly articles and has received numerous awards for his scientific and public health contributions, including the US Public Health Service’s highest honor award, the PHS Distinguished Service Medal, and CDC’s William C. Watson Medal of Excellence award.
I would like to extend a special thank you to Dr. Ken Castro for acting as the Director of the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention for the past twelve months. He provided excellent leadership and service to NCHHSTP. Please join me in welcoming Dr. Eugene McCray as Director of DHAP. I look forward to your support of Dr. McCray as we continue our work to prevent and treat HIV.

All the best,



Jono



Jonathan H. Mermin, MD, MPH
Director
National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
www.cdc.gov/nchhstp

Dear Colleagues,
I am delighted to announce that beginning August 11, 2014, Dr. Eugene McCray will serve as the Director of the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP) in NCHHSTP. Dr. McCray brings many years of domestic and global experience in HIV and TB prevention and control to his work in DHAP.
[McCray Photo_Oct2007]
Eugene McCray, MD

Many of you know Dr. McCray, as he has been instrumental in CDC’s efforts from the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and in 2000 he helped to stand up and then lead CDC’s Global AIDS Program. Dr. McCray began his career at the CDC in 1983 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer and has since served in a number of capacities throughout CDC.

Dr. McCray most recently was the Chief of the International Research and Programs Branch in DTBE. Prior to this position, Dr. McCray was the Acting Deputy Director in the Coordinating Office for Global Health at CDC from 2004 to 2007 and Director of CDC’s Global AIDS Program from 2000 to 2004. In these positions, Dr. McCray directed and developed epidemiological, programmatic, and research activities, as well as facilitated collaboration across CDC, with other US government agencies, multilateral and international agencies, and Ministries of Health. He is recognized globally as an expert in HIV/AIDS and TB and has dedicated most of his career to improving the health of underserved communities both in the United States and globally.
Dr. McCray completed his clinical training in internal medicine at North Carolina Memorial Hospital, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 1983 and an Infectious Diseases Fellowship in 1992 at University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. He has authored or co-authored more than 60 scholarly articles and has received numerous awards for his scientific and public health contributions, including the US Public Health Service’s highest honor award, the PHS Distinguished Service Medal, and CDC’s William C. Watson Medal of Excellence award.
I would like to extend a special thank you to Dr. Ken Castro for acting as the Director of the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention for the past twelve months. He provided excellent leadership and service to NCHHSTP. Please join me in welcoming Dr. Eugene McCray as Director of DHAP. I look forward to your support of Dr. McCray as we continue our work to prevent and treat HIV.

All the best,

Jono

Jonathan H. Mermin, MD, MPH
Director
National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
www.cdc.gov/nchhstp

Don’t freak out over the cost of condoms.  You can get them for free at your local public health office.

Don’t freak out over the cost of condoms.  You can get them for free at your local public health office.

(Source: yahooscreen)

Tags: condoms

[Attachment(s) from gans, andrew, DOH included below]
Our next CPAG statewide meeting is in two weeks on Friday, August 8th.

This is our second and last meeting at Heights Cumberland.

The agenda is attached and below.

;)
A

Andrew A. Gans, MPH
HIV, STD and Hepatitis Section Manager
New Mexico Department of HEALTH (NMDOH)
[nm-cpg agenda-august2014.png]

[Attachment(s) from gans, andrew, DOH included below]
Our next CPAG statewide meeting is in two weeks on Friday, August 8th.

This is our second and last meeting at Heights Cumberland.

The agenda is attached and below.

;)
A

Andrew A. Gans, MPH
HIV, STD and Hepatitis Section Manager
New Mexico Department of HEALTH (NMDOH)
[nm-cpg agenda-august2014.png]

http://www.advocate.com/health/2014/07/22/shocking-increase-hiv-infection-rate-among-young-gay-bi-men



Shocking Increase in HIV Infection Rate Among Young Gay, Bi Men
While overall HIV infection rates have decreased nationwide, young gay men are seeing a frightening uptick in new infections, according to the CDC.
BY Sunnivie Brydum
July 22 2014 2:49 PM ET
[http://www.advocate.com/sites/advocate.com/files/imagecache/stories/HIV-Blood-Test-x400.jpg]

New HIV infections among gay and bisexual men between the ages of 13 and 24 increased by a staggering 132.5 percent between 2001 and 2011, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But the annual diagnosis rate for the general American population dropped by a third over the same time period, according to research culled from CDC data and published today in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Although 500,000 new cases of HIV were diagnosed over the decade-long study, the annual rate of diagnoses decreased from 24 out of every 100,000 people to 16 out of every 100,000 people, marking a decrease in annual rate of diagnosis by 33 percent, according to WebMD’s HealthDay News.

Advances in screening and prevention efforts have prompted the overall decrease in new infections, according to the report, as annual diagnosis rates dropped for heterosexual men by about one-quarter, among women by about half, and among intravenous drug users by nearly 70 percent.

But those messages and prevention efforts seem to be missing the youngest generation, which is also less likely to be tested regularly, according to the report. Between 2001 and 2011, newly diagnosed cases among young gay and bisexual men rose from about 3,000 to roughly 7,000, according to WebMD. Although the study did not report the mode of infection for these young men, researchers suggest the numbers indicate that many in the group are having condomless sex. And while the World Health Organization and the federal government recently suggested all gay men and other high-risk groups use pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, the treatment, which involves HIV-negative individuals using antiretroviral medications, is controversial, as some say it encourages higher-risk behavior, like having sex without condoms.

"There’s a new generation that comes up and many don’t have firsthand experience with the devastation we saw in the earlier years," lead study author Amy Lansky, the CDC’s deputy director for surveillance, epidemiology and laboratory science in the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention in Atlanta told Bloomberg Businessweek.

"It’s been more than 30 years since the first cases were reported," Lansky told HealthDay News. “It’s harder to maintain that sense of urgency.”

Lansky also noted that gay and bisexual men have a higher prevalence of HIV, putting them at “greater risk of being exposed with each sexual encounter.” Greater rates of substance abuse and lack of access to health care play a role in the increasing rates among young men, as well, Lansky said.

Thanks to an increase in data collection nationwide, this study was the first to look at HIV incidence rates in people age 13 and older in all 50 states, and Washington, D.C., over a 10-year period. And while the overall annual diagnosis rate decreased by 33 percent, the report notes that an estimated 1.1 million Americans are living with HIV - and roughly 16 percent of those individuals don’t know they’re infected.
Tags: AIDS, HIV, Health

http://www.advocate.com/health/2014/07/22/shocking-increase-hiv-infection-rate-among-young-gay-bi-men

Shocking Increase in HIV Infection Rate Among Young Gay, Bi Men
While overall HIV infection rates have decreased nationwide, young gay men are seeing a frightening uptick in new infections, according to the CDC.
BY Sunnivie Brydum
July 22 2014 2:49 PM ET
[http://www.advocate.com/sites/advocate.com/files/imagecache/stories/HIV-Blood-Test-x400.jpg]

New HIV infections among gay and bisexual men between the ages of 13 and 24 increased by a staggering 132.5 percent between 2001 and 2011, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But the annual diagnosis rate for the general American population dropped by a third over the same time period, according to research culled from CDC data and published today in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Although 500,000 new cases of HIV were diagnosed over the decade-long study, the annual rate of diagnoses decreased from 24 out of every 100,000 people to 16 out of every 100,000 people, marking a decrease in annual rate of diagnosis by 33 percent, according to WebMD’s HealthDay News.

Advances in screening and prevention efforts have prompted the overall decrease in new infections, according to the report, as annual diagnosis rates dropped for heterosexual men by about one-quarter, among women by about half, and among intravenous drug users by nearly 70 percent.

But those messages and prevention efforts seem to be missing the youngest generation, which is also less likely to be tested regularly, according to the report. Between 2001 and 2011, newly diagnosed cases among young gay and bisexual men rose from about 3,000 to roughly 7,000, according to WebMD. Although the study did not report the mode of infection for these young men, researchers suggest the numbers indicate that many in the group are having condomless sex. And while the World Health Organization and the federal government recently suggested all gay men and other high-risk groups use pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, the treatment, which involves HIV-negative individuals using antiretroviral medications, is controversial, as some say it encourages higher-risk behavior, like having sex without condoms.

"There’s a new generation that comes up and many don’t have firsthand experience with the devastation we saw in the earlier years," lead study author Amy Lansky, the CDC’s deputy director for surveillance, epidemiology and laboratory science in the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention in Atlanta told Bloomberg Businessweek.

"It’s been more than 30 years since the first cases were reported," Lansky told HealthDay News. “It’s harder to maintain that sense of urgency.”

Lansky also noted that gay and bisexual men have a higher prevalence of HIV, putting them at “greater risk of being exposed with each sexual encounter.” Greater rates of substance abuse and lack of access to health care play a role in the increasing rates among young men, as well, Lansky said.

Thanks to an increase in data collection nationwide, this study was the first to look at HIV incidence rates in people age 13 and older in all 50 states, and Washington, D.C., over a 10-year period. And while the overall annual diagnosis rate decreased by 33 percent, the report notes that an estimated 1.1 million Americans are living with HIV - and roughly 16 percent of those individuals don’t know they’re infected.
Tags: AIDS, HIV, Health

CPAG Agenda Planning Call Reminder

Hi Everyone!

A reminder that tomorrow is the monthly CPAG agenda planning call at 10:30 am. Please join if you have ideas on what to include in our next meeting.

Phone number: 1-888-757-2790
Participant code: 949251

Thanks!
Katherine

Katherine Wagner, MIPH
HIV Prevention Evaluation Coordinator

Hi Everyone!

Thank you so much to everyone who has answered the CPAG survey, we’ve gotten some great responses. The survey is still open through Friday July 25th, so if you haven’t taken the survey yet, please take 10 minutes to provide feedback about how we can improve CPAG meetings to make them more meaningful for participants and our community:

Also, if you would rather provide feedback directly, feel free to send me an e-mail with your thoughts.

Thank you so much!
Katherine

Katherine Wagner, MIPH
HIV Prevention Evaluation Coordinator
New Mexico Department of Health