Agenda Planning Call Reminder and Minutes

A reminder that the monthly CPAG Agenda Planning call is tomorrow at 10:30 am. The theme for September’s meeting will be “HIV and Gay Men.” If you have any ideas about potential presentations, discussion topics, new research, new interventions, etc., please join! If you have ideas that you would like to share and can’t make the meeting, please send an e-mail to one of the co-chairs and they’ll bring your ideas to the meeting (tony.escudero@state.nm.us or martin.walker505@gmail.com). Call-in info is:

Phone number: 888-757-2790
Participant code: 949251

Also, please find attached last month’s minutes.

Thanks!
Katherine

Katherine Wagner, MIPH
HIV Prevention Evaluation Coordinator


 

Tags: calendar

The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program was signed into law 24 years ago this week. Look back at accomplishments over the years in the Living History:

Project ECHO Addictions Training

Greetings!

Project ECHO at UNMHSC will offer a Community Addictions Recovery Specialist (CARS) training in Albuquerque on October 2-3, followed by 8 weekly telehealth conferences. The training is free - participants will receive a CARS Certificate of Completion from Project ECHO and CEUs if applicable. The description/registration form is attached.

Please let me know if you have any questions and please feel free to share with any interested colleagues. Thanks so much!
Jeanne

Jeanne Block, RN, MS
CARS Coordinator
Project ECHO
UNMHSC

SAVE THE DATE: 2014 Case Manager Summit

SAVE THE DATE: 2014 Case Manager Summit

Thursday, October 23, 2014 (All day meeting)
Details and agenda to come soon but book it in your calendar now!!


* Learn about new federal policies for the Ryan White Program and how they will impact New Mexico and your clients

* Gain hands-on training to better navigate the state’s Medicaid system

* Review and discuss lessons learned from the first round of ACA and provide feedback on policies

* Find out what options and policies will be supported by the state’s Ryan White Care and Treatment Program during the next Marketplace Open Enrollment Period (coming November 2014)

* And celebrate the success from the first round of ACA implementation!

Location:
Heights Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Room 407
8600 Academy Rd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111

Required Training for ALL Case Managers - Others Welcome

Anne Marlow-Geter, MPH
HIV Services Program Manager

Tags: calendar

All People With Hepatitis C Deserve Lifesaving Treatment

Community Sign-on: All People With Hepatitis C Deserve Lifesaving Treatment


In response to the escalating crisis in access to new, lifesaving hepatitis C medications, a coalition of organizations and medical providers (see list below) has developed the following sign-on statement. Everyone living with hepatitis C who wants to be treated and cured should have access to treatment without barriers. This statement calls on all stakeholders to work together on a solution that ends the current practice of rationing hepatitis C treatment and sends a strong statement that all lives are worth saving.
You can sign this statement here.
Individuals, organizations, and medical providers are all encouraged to sign.
Your signature indicates permission for it to be used in a variety of advocacy and media activities.
Deadline to be listed in first publicly released version of the statement: 5 pm Eastern, Friday, August 15, 2014. Signatures will be accepted after this deadline and the statement will be updated on a weekly basis with new signatures.

ALL PEOPLE WITH HEPATITIS C DESERVE LIFESAVING TREATMENT
The undersigned organizations, medical providers, and community members are alarmed by the escalating crisis in access to new lifesaving hepatitis C treatments. These drugs have the potential to help us end the hepatitis C epidemic and save thousands of lives. Although the Affordable Care Act recently helped millions of Americans gain access to health coverage, many for the first time, the ACA mandate that no individual be denied insurance based on a pre-existing condition is meaningless if that coverage restricts access to the treatment needed to cure that condition. Policies that deny access to new, highly effective hepatitis C treatment altogether or limit treatment only to the sickest patients violate laws that now ban discrimination against specific patient populations. They also undermine our ability to address health inequities and disparities, particularly among communities of color, which are more likely to face barriers to health care access and have disproportionally higher hepatitis C prevalence.
The FDA approval of highly promising hepatitis C treatments last year brought tremendous hope, as it marked the beginning of a new era in treating and curing the disease. With high cure rates, significantly reduced side effects compared to previous regimens, and shorter treatment durations compared to previous regimens, these new therapies, along with others in the pipeline, provide an opportunity to end needless suffering and death from extrahepatic conditions, end-stage liver disease, and liver cancer, while reducing and potentially eliminating new infections. Twenty-five years after the discovery of the hepatitis C virus, the tools are now available to eliminate a chronic, infectious, life-threatening disease that, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention needlessly hastens the death of 15,000 to as many as 50,000 Americans per year.
We are therefore united in our call to all stakeholders, including public and private payers, the pharmaceutical industry, and government to work together to eliminate the barriers that have caused rationing of hepatitis C treatment:

1. Hepatitis C pharmaceutical companies must commit to affordable pricing, broad accessibility, and transparent, good-faith negotiations with payers;

2. Stakeholders must engage members of the patient, provider, and advocacy community in a process to address access barriers and to minimize consumer cost-sharing obligations;

3. Payers must ensure that individuals who inject drugs, the group most at risk for new infections, are not systemically excluded from treatment; and

4. We must send a strong message to all people with hepatitis C: they deserve to be cured and that everything is being done to end the current rationing of treatment.
In addition, no utilization management or prior authorization requirements must be put in place by public or private payers except when it can be demonstrated that such restrictions are developed through a transparent process that:

a. Is in accordance with clinical factors and not just cost effectiveness;

b. Involves consultation with recognized hepatitis C medical experts;

c. Includes meaningful input from the hepatitis C patient and advocate community; and

d. Requires each payer to maintain an exceptions process for any individual to appeal a denial of access based on their specific individual circumstances.
The only way we will stop the treatment access crisis is for all stakeholders to come to the table and develop solutions. The federal government, through its role in implementing the Affordable Care Act and ensuring access to affordable, quality care for all Americans has a responsibility to ensure that these discussions happen quickly, transparently, and with meaningful input from leading hepatitis C medical experts, community leaders, and, most importantly, people with hepatitis C.
Eliminating hepatitis C in the United States would be one of the greatest public health achievements of the 21st century. The question is not can we eliminate the virus, but do all stakeholders have the will to come together and develop real solutions. As a community, we will not rest until hepatitis C is eliminated, and we are committed to working with all stakeholders to achieve this goal. All people living with or at risk for hepatitis C, along with their families, their friends and their loved ones deserve no less.


You can sign up through this link: http://nvhr.org/content/HCVsignon


Laine M Snow
Viral Hepatitis Prevention Coordinator

Tags: hepatitis

HIV Services Advisory Council: August 26th

Just a friendly reminder that the next meeting of the HIV Services Advisory Council will be Tuesday, August 26th, from 1:30 - 3 p.m. A copy of the meeting agenda will be sent soon.
As usual, the meeting will be available by conference call and via ECHO viewing sites.
Contact Info:
Telephone Dial-in Number: (877) 746-4263
PIN Number: 02 71 684#

Location:
Dolphin Room, UNM Project ECHO, Integrity Building, 1101 Medical Arts Dr, Albuquerque

Anne Marlow-Geter, MPH
HIV Services Program Manager

Tags: calendar

Circle of Harmony Request for Abstracts

Good evening all,

The 12th Circle of Harmony Conference Request for Abstracts has been released. Attached you will find the Call for Abstracts which will give you necessary information about the RFA. The second attached document is the RFA Workplan.

Deadline for abstract submission is December 5, 2014.

All submitted abstracts will be reviewed and evaluated on the following criteria:

* Quality of proposal
* Relevance to the conference focus area
* Well-defined syllabus and three (3) learning objectives/deliverables
* Originality of presentation style and opportunity for participant involvement
* Review of previous presentation evaluations, if applicable
Please send completed RFA work plans to Ayn Whyte at awhyte@aaihb.org.

Reminder:
Circle of Harmony Conference
April 20 - 22, 2015

Kurt

Tags: 2015COH

NM HCV Coalition List Serve

Good afternoon,

For those of you interested, the NM HCV Coalition now has a listserve to post articles, messages and any other relevant info to. To join the list serve go to the following link: http://it.unm.edu/email/listsignup.html. Type in or cut and paste: NMHCVCOALITION-L. From the subscription settings page, simply enter your info. You can also un-subscribe from the listserve from this page.

Send posts/messages to: NMHCVCOALITION-L@LIST.UNM.EDU once you have joined. Currently we have 48 subscribers.

If you have any questions or need assistance please email me or Miranda Sedillo (mlsedillo@salud.unm.edu).

Have an Awesome Week,

Laine


Laine M Snow
Viral Hepatitis Prevention Coordinator

Tags: hepatitis

http://www.temple.edu/medicine/temple_researchers_eliminate_hiv_virus_from_human_cells.htm Temple University Researchers Successfully Eliminate the HIV Virus from Cultured Human Cells for the First Time July 21, 2014
[lab research]
The HIV-1 virus has proved to be tenacious, inserting its genome permanently into its victims’ DNA, forcing patients to take a lifelong drug regimen to control the virus and prevent a fresh attack. Now, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers has designed a way to snip out the integrated HIV-1 genes for good.
"This is one important step on the path toward a permanent cure for AIDS," said Kamel Khalili, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Neuroscience at Temple. Dr. Khalili and his colleague, Wenhui Hu, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Neuroscience at Temple, led the work which marks the first successful attempt to eliminate latent HIV-1 virus from human cells. "It’s an exciting discovery, but it’s not yet ready to go into the clinic. It’s a proof of concept that we’re moving in the right direction," added Dr. Khalili, who is also Director of the Center for Neurovirology and Director of the Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center at Temple.
In a study published July 21 by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Khalili and colleagues detail how they created molecular tools to delete the HIV-1 proviral DNA. When deployed, a combination of a DNA-snipping enzyme called a nuclease and a targeting strand of RNA called a guide RNA (gRNA) hunt down the viral genome and excise the HIV-1 DNA. From there, the cell’s gene repair machinery takes over, soldering the loose ends of the genome back together - resulting in virus-free cells.
"Since HIV-1 is never cleared by the immune system, removal of the virus is required in order to cure the disease," said Dr. Khalili, whose research focuses on the neuropathogenesis of viral infections. The same technique could theoretically be used against a variety of viruses, he said.
The research shows that these molecular tools also hold promise as a therapeutic vaccine; cells armed with the nuclease-RNA combination proved impervious to HIV infection.
Worldwide, more than 33 million people have HIV, including more than 1 million in the United States. Every year, another 50,000 Americans contract the virus, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has controlled HIV-1 for infected people in the developed world over the last 15 years, the virus can rage again with any interruption in treatment. Even when HIV-1 replication is well controlled with HAART, the lingering HIV-1 presence has health consequences. “The low level replication of HIV-1 makes patients more likely to suffer from diseases usually associated with aging,” Dr. Khalili said. These include cardiomyopathy - a weakening of the heart muscle - bone disease, kidney disease, and neurocognitive disorders. “These problems are often exacerbated by the toxic drugs that must be taken to control the virus,” Dr. Khalili added.
Researchers based the two-part HIV-1 editor on a system that evolved as a bacterial defense mechanism to protect against infection, Dr. Khalili said. Dr. Khalili’s lab engineered a 20-nucleotide strand of gRNA to target the HIV-1 DNA and paired it with Cas9. The gRNA targets the control region of the gene called the long terminal repeat (LTR). LTRs are present on both ends of the HIV-1 genome. By targeting both LTRs, the Cas9 nuclease can snip out the 9,709-nucleotides that comprise the HIV-1 genome. To avoid any risk of the gRNA accidentally binding with any part of the patient’s genome, the researchers selected nucleotide sequences that do not appear in any coding sequences of human DNA, thereby avoiding off-target effects and subsequent cellular DNA damage.
The editing process was successful in several cell types that can harbor HIV-1, including microglia and macrophages, as well as in T-lymphocytes. “T-cells and monocytic cells are the main cell types infected by HIV-1, so they are the most important targets for this technology,” Dr. Khalili said.
The HIV-1 eradication approach faces several significant challenges before the technique is ready for patients, Dr. Khalili said. The researchers must devise a method to deliver the therapeutic agent to every single infected cell. Finally, because HIV-1 is prone to mutations, treatment may need to be individualized for each patient’s unique viral sequences.
"We are working on a number of strategies so we can take the construct into preclinical studies," Dr. Khalili said. "We want to eradicate every single copy of HIV-1 from the patient. That will cure AIDS. I think this technology is the way we can do it."
In addition to Dr. Khalili and Hu, the other authors of the PNAS paper are Rafal Kaminski, Fan Yang, Yonggang Zhang, of Temple’s Department of Neuroscience; Biao Luo of the Cancer Genome Institute, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple University School of Medicine; Jonathan Karn, David Alvarez-Carbonell, Yoelvis Garcia, of the Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland; and Xianming Mo of the Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology in the West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China. The research was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health (R01MH093271; R01NS087971; and P30MH092177).

http://www.temple.edu/medicine/temple_researchers_eliminate_hiv_virus_from_human_cells.htm
Temple University Researchers Successfully Eliminate the HIV Virus from Cultured Human Cells for the First Time
July 21, 2014

[lab research]

The HIV-1 virus has proved to be tenacious, inserting its genome permanently into its victims’ DNA, forcing patients to take a lifelong drug regimen to control the virus and prevent a fresh attack. Now, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers has designed a way to snip out the integrated HIV-1 genes for good.

"This is one important step on the path toward a permanent cure for AIDS," said Kamel Khalili, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Neuroscience at Temple. Dr. Khalili and his colleague, Wenhui Hu, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Neuroscience at Temple, led the work which marks the first successful attempt to eliminate latent HIV-1 virus from human cells. "It’s an exciting discovery, but it’s not yet ready to go into the clinic. It’s a proof of concept that we’re moving in the right direction," added Dr. Khalili, who is also Director of the Center for Neurovirology and Director of the Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center at Temple.

In a study published July 21 by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Khalili and colleagues detail how they created molecular tools to delete the HIV-1 proviral DNA. When deployed, a combination of a DNA-snipping enzyme called a nuclease and a targeting strand of RNA called a guide RNA (gRNA) hunt down the viral genome and excise the HIV-1 DNA. From there, the cell’s gene repair machinery takes over, soldering the loose ends of the genome back together - resulting in virus-free cells.

"Since HIV-1 is never cleared by the immune system, removal of the virus is required in order to cure the disease," said Dr. Khalili, whose research focuses on the neuropathogenesis of viral infections. The same technique could theoretically be used against a variety of viruses, he said.

The research shows that these molecular tools also hold promise as a therapeutic vaccine; cells armed with the nuclease-RNA combination proved impervious to HIV infection.

Worldwide, more than 33 million people have HIV, including more than 1 million in the United States. Every year, another 50,000 Americans contract the virus, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has controlled HIV-1 for infected people in the developed world over the last 15 years, the virus can rage again with any interruption in treatment. Even when HIV-1 replication is well controlled with HAART, the lingering HIV-1 presence has health consequences. “The low level replication of HIV-1 makes patients more likely to suffer from diseases usually associated with aging,” Dr. Khalili said. These include cardiomyopathy - a weakening of the heart muscle - bone disease, kidney disease, and neurocognitive disorders. “These problems are often exacerbated by the toxic drugs that must be taken to control the virus,” Dr. Khalili added.

Researchers based the two-part HIV-1 editor on a system that evolved as a bacterial defense mechanism to protect against infection, Dr. Khalili said. Dr. Khalili’s lab engineered a 20-nucleotide strand of gRNA to target the HIV-1 DNA and paired it with Cas9. The gRNA targets the control region of the gene called the long terminal repeat (LTR). LTRs are present on both ends of the HIV-1 genome. By targeting both LTRs, the Cas9 nuclease can snip out the 9,709-nucleotides that comprise the HIV-1 genome. To avoid any risk of the gRNA accidentally binding with any part of the patient’s genome, the researchers selected nucleotide sequences that do not appear in any coding sequences of human DNA, thereby avoiding off-target effects and subsequent cellular DNA damage.

The editing process was successful in several cell types that can harbor HIV-1, including microglia and macrophages, as well as in T-lymphocytes. “T-cells and monocytic cells are the main cell types infected by HIV-1, so they are the most important targets for this technology,” Dr. Khalili said.

The HIV-1 eradication approach faces several significant challenges before the technique is ready for patients, Dr. Khalili said. The researchers must devise a method to deliver the therapeutic agent to every single infected cell. Finally, because HIV-1 is prone to mutations, treatment may need to be individualized for each patient’s unique viral sequences.

"We are working on a number of strategies so we can take the construct into preclinical studies," Dr. Khalili said. "We want to eradicate every single copy of HIV-1 from the patient. That will cure AIDS. I think this technology is the way we can do it."

In addition to Dr. Khalili and Hu, the other authors of the PNAS paper are Rafal Kaminski, Fan Yang, Yonggang Zhang, of Temple’s Department of Neuroscience; Biao Luo of the Cancer Genome Institute, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple University School of Medicine; Jonathan Karn, David Alvarez-Carbonell, Yoelvis Garcia, of the Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland; and Xianming Mo of the Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology in the West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
The research was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health (R01MH093271; R01NS087971; and P30MH092177).

Tags: HIVNews HIV aids

Tags: NASTAD HIV

Job opening in Roswell - Disease Prevention Supervisor

Greetings all -

An important position on our statewide Disease Prevention Team (DPT) has posted for recruitment. Please help us to spread the word to qualified candidates.

The posting can be seen here.

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/newmexico/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=929552

The deadline is a week from Monday, on August 11th. Candidates should be sure to attach all required documents such as academic transcripts.

A summary of the position is pasted below.

;)
A


Andrew A. Gans, MPH
HIV, STD and Hepatitis Section Manager
New Mexico Department of HEALTH (NMDOH)
1190 St. Francis Drive, Room S-1302
Santa Fe, NM 87502-6110
(505) 476-3624
Fax: (505) 827-2862
andrew.gans@state.nm.us
Searchable HIV/STD/Hepatitis/Harm Reduction
resources on the web: www.nmhivguide.org

Tags: jobposting